my_fathers_my_mother_and_me

MY FATHERS, MY MOTHER AND ME + Q&A

Q&A with Børge Madsen and Brit Mühleisen
Dir: Paul-Julien Robert
Austria / 2012 / 93mins

TICKETS NO LONGER AVAILABLE

Date: Thu 16 January, 2014
Time: 20:50
Price: SOLD OUT
There are currently no screenings of this film.

In 1972, Otto Muehl founded a controversial commune in Friedrichshof, Austria, based on common property ownership, free love and liberation from family ties. In order to break with the nuclear family model entirely, the children of the commune were never to know the identity of their biological fathers and were cared for communally. By the commune's logic, the freedom from paternal authority would lead to greater creativity and personal development.

Drawing on a fascinating and extensive archive of footage shot by the members themselves, Paul-Julien Robert's quietly devastating documentary revisits the place where he spent the first twelve years of his life, until Otto Muehl's incarceration in 1991. Through penetrating interviews with his mother, former members and other children born into this social experiment, Robert reveals the true nature of one of the most famous sex communes in the world, and the deep-rooted debilitating effects it had on its members.

BFI London Film Festival Jury President Kate Ogborn said:

"As a jury we would like to recognise the bravery of Paul-Julien Robert for taking us on such a personal journey with My Fathers, My Mother & Me. It is a thought- provoking and disturbing film, intimate whilst also raising larger questions of power, parental responsibility and abuse. The incredible archive footage combined with the personal journey of a mother and son left us disturbed, angry and feeling that this is a film that deserves to be seen by a wider audience."

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Børge Madsen and Brit Mühleisen, and chaired by Alexandra Stein.

Børge Madsen and Brit Mühleisen were both part of Friedrichshof for 3 and 5 years respectively. They lived mainly in the many smaller groups spread across Europe forming the entire Friedrichshof empire. Both left the commune in early 80's as group life became increasingly repressive.

Alexandra Stein, Ph.D. is an academic and writer specializing in the study of cults and totalitarianism. She lectures at Birkbeck and the Mary Ward Centre, and works to support former members of cults through counselling and a support group.

"The incredible archive footage combined with the personal journey of a mother and son left us disturbed, angry and feeling that this is a film that deserves to be seen by a wider audience." - Kate Ogborn, BFI London Film Festival Jury

Winner: Best Documentary - BFI London Film Festival 2013